Nearly 50 years in IT, 25 years of baking and cooking. Follow me on instagram @mike_nolan_nebraska

Measuring Pie Dough Thickness

How do you measure the thickness of pie dough?

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Take the Daily Quiz at My Nebraska Kitchen!

In March of 2019, My Nebraska Kitchen started offering a daily quiz question. Every day we’ll have a new question on a food-related topic. Click on this link: https://mynebraskakitchen.com/wordpress/wp_quiz/ or select it from the main menu and from there you can browse through the archives to take the earlier ones. There’s a daily theme. Monday:…

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Published:March 23, 2019 View Post

Baking

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Beginning the low-salt journey

A week ago my cardiologist put me on a low salt and restricted liquids diet. Yesterday was my first trip to the grocery store since this life-changing event, and I have to say I’m both depressed and frustrated by the limited options available to me and the millions of Americans like me who need to…

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Getting Seeds to Stick to Bread

In a recent thread on My Nebraska Kitchen, the issue of how to get seeds to stick to bread came up. So, today I tried an experiment. I made a batch of Chicago-style hot dog buns (the KAF recipe), making 12 buns. (We like our buns a little smaller than what the recipe suggests.) I…

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Published:September 6, 2017 View Post

Baking

5 Responses

Aspen House Restaurant – Great Dining in the High Plains

Rawlins, Wyoming, is not the sort of place where you’d expect to find a great restaurant, but we did. The Aspen House restaurant is in an old Victorian-style house built in 1905 that has been converted into a restaurant. The room we were in was probably a parlor or breakfast room, although it may have…

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Published:July 11, 2017 View Post

Uncategorized

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Gravy – the real Mother (and Father) sauce

Classically trained chefs, please stop reading this column now. OK, you’ve been warned. In classic French cooking there are five mother sauces, as first set forth by Marie-Antoine Carême and later revised by Auguste Escoffier: Béchamel, Velouté, Espagnol, Tomato and Hollandaise. These are called mother sauces because they’re the starting point for hundreds of sauces….

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Uncle George and the (Pepper) Dragon

A Christmas tradition in my wife’s family is to serve oyster stew on Christmas Eve, with the men doing the cooking. For years, this task fell to my wife’s Uncle George. One year he was humming along, the oysters had been butter poached, the milk was nearly hot enough, and he reached for the ground…

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Published:December 7, 2016 View Post

Cooking

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The Butter Did it–The Art of Reading Cookbooks

Most people have a few authors or genres that they prefer to read, often reading the same book many times. I’m fond of the novels of Tom Clancy and Jean Auel’s Earth’s Children series, for example, as well as the Emma Lathen mysteries series and the works of Ayn Rand. But I’m also fond of…

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My Kind Of (Restaurant) Town

One of the best parts about spending most of a week in Chicago for Chocolate Boot Camp was that Chicago has always been a town that I’ve enjoyed eating in. It’s never really been a ‘fancy restaurant’ town, even though it has two restaurants that have earned the elusive three-star rating from Michelin. Chicago’s more…

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My Week At Chocolate Boot Camp – Day 4

It’s day 4, the last day of Chocolate Boot Camp. (Most Chocolate Academy courses are three days long, but this is a four-day course, because there’s so much material to cover. Click here to read the report on Day 1 and Days 2 and 3.) Today we need to finish everything, and there’s a lot…

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My Week At Chocolate Boot Camp – Days 2 and 3

Day 2 of Chocolate Boot Camp started out pretty much where day 1 left off, tempering dark chocolate.  (Here’s Part 1 of this series.) On the table in the morning, using the seed method in the afternoon.  I figured out what I did wrong with my seed method batch on Monday, I misread the scale,…

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My Week at Chocolate Boot Camp – Day 1

Chocolate is something I’ve dabbled with over the years, covering home made candy (especially sponge candy) with milk chocolate, for example, but I really didn’t know anything about working with chocolate, much less making items that would look professionally made. Well, to correct that, I recently attended the course called ‘Chocolate 1.0 – Discovering Chocolate’…

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Cooking an Eye of Round Roast

If you do a search on how to cook eye of round, one of the most commonly suggested methods is to preheat the oven to 500, salt and pepper the roast, drop the temp to 475 and cook it for 7 minutes/pound, then turn the heat off and let it coast for 2 1/2 hours…

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Published:August 24, 2016 View Post

Cooking

11 Responses

The Cutting Edge or How Sharp is your Knife?

Take your best knife out and look at it closely.  How sharp is it? Probably not as sharp as you think it is. Here’s one of my favorite knives, a 7 1/2 inch Chinese cleaver: Looks pretty sharp, eh? Let’s look at it a bit closer, at about 3X power: Still look pretty sharp? Let’s…

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Published:July 16, 2016 View Post

Cooking

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Delicious Liasons – the Science and Art of Thickening

Liason. The very word conjures up images of entanglements, and well it should, since it comes from the French verb lier, to bind. In cooking, a liason is something added to a liquid, like a sauce or a soup, to bind or thicken it. There are two basic kinds of liasons–starches, like flour, and proteins,…

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Vinagrettes – Traditional and not-so-traditional

The textbook definition of a vinagrette is a suspension of an oil and vinegar, an acid, possibly with other seasonings in it. Sometimes, depending on what you add, it becomes an emulsion rather than a suspension. (A suspension usually separates, requiring it to be stirred or shaken again, an emulsion doesn’t, because there’s an emulsifier…

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Published:June 13, 2016 View Post

Cooking

2 Responses

Things they don’t tell you about home grain milling

A few years ago I received a Nutrimill machine as a Christmas present from my older son, along with a big bucket of soft red wheat berries.  As Christmas presents go, it’s probably been one of my favorites over the past 25 years, certainly one that opened up a new world for me. Milling my…

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Published:May 27, 2016 View Post

Baking

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No Garlic, Please!

“Hello, my name is Jeff, I’ll be your server today.” “Hi, Jeff.  My wife has an allergy to garlic, can you tell me what’s safe for her to eat?” “Gee, I’ll have to check with the kitchen, what are you interested in?” “Can you check on today’s soup, on the fish, on the chicken and…

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Welcome to My Nebraska Kitchen

Welcome to My Nebraska Kitchen!  We are a site for discussing cooking and baking that is functional, easy to use, entertaining and informative. Available Now: A Discussion Forums area. A number of the people who were active in the King Arthur Flour Baking Circle are reading and posting on this forum, but it is open…

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Published:May 11, 2016 View Post

Administrative

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