Vinagrettes – Traditional and not-so-traditional

The textbook definition of a vinagrette is a suspension of an oil and vinegar, an acid, possibly with other seasonings in it. Sometimes, depending on what you add, it becomes an emulsion rather than a suspension. (A suspension usually separates, requiring it to be stirred or shaken again, an emulsion doesn’t, because there’s an emulsifier present, which holds the oil and vinegar in suspension.)

I got to thinking about the chicken breasts marinated in Marsala and mustard I made last week and came to the conclusion that the combination of wine (an acid) and mustard (oil-based) is essentially a vinagrette.

The proportions are different, though. The traditional proportions in a salad dressing vinagrette is 3 parts olive oil to one part vinegar.

For my chicken breasts I used about a half cup of wine and around a tablespoon of mustard, so it was probably about 8 parts acid to one part oil. I put the chicken in a bag, added the wine, squeezed in some mustard, and shook it all up. 8 hours or so marinating, followed by about 45 minutes on the grill.

So, what are your favorite types of vinagrette?

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Published:June 13, 2016

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  • #1473
    Mike Nolan
    Keymaster

    The textbook definition of a vinagrette is a suspension of an oil and an acid, generally a vinegar, possibly with other seasonings in it. Sometimes, depending on what you add, it becomes an emulsion r
    [See the full post at: Vinagrettes – Traditional and not-so-traditional]

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    #1960
    BakerAunt
    Participant

    I do not get to do many vinaigrettes, as my husband does not do well with acidic foods. When I saw this topic, I remembered a recipe for Pasta con il Pollo e il Rosmarino–Pasta with Rosemary Chicken that appears in Nick Stellino’s Glorious Italian Cooking: Romantic Meals, Menus and Music from Cucina Amore (Putnam, 1999), pp. 78-79. I made it for him once, but he said it did not go well with his digestion. Sigh.

    In this recipe, boneless chicken breasts are marinated overnight in the refrigerator in 4 Tbs. olive oil, 3 Tbs. balsamic vinegar, 1/2 tsp salt, and 2 Tbs. chopped rosemary. The next day, the chicken is roasted, then cut into pieces and served with pasta in a light cream sauce. It is delicious, and I miss being able to do this kind of cooking. It would be a more interesting post in the “What Did You Cook?” thread than what I have been posting.

    I used to watch Nick Stellino’s show, Cucina Amore, on PBS. Then, suddenly, he was gone, and a not very charismatic host narrated dishes by the “chefs” of Cucina Amore. I googled him, and he is still cooking and has a PBS show. I must not be in an area where it is shown.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 5 months ago by BakerAunt.
    • This reply was modified 4 years, 5 months ago by BakerAunt.
    #2230
    KIDPIZZA
    Participant

    I do not get to do many vinaigrettes, as my husband does not do well with acidic foods. When I saw this topic, I remembered a recipe for Pasta con il Pollo e il Rosmarino–Pasta with Rosemary Chicken that appears in Nick Stellino’s Glorious Italian Cooking: Romantic Meals, Menus and Music from Cucina Amore (Putnam, 1999), pp. 78-79. I made it for him once, but he said it did not go well with his digestion. Sigh.

    In this recipe, boneless chicken breasts are marinated overnight in the refrigerator in 4 Tbs. olive oil, 3 Tbs. balsamic vinegar, 1/2 tsp salt, and 2 Tbs. chopped rosemary. The next day, the chicken is roasted, then cut into pieces and served with pasta in a light cream sauce. It is delicious, and I miss being able to do this kind of cooking. It would be a more interesting post in the “What Did You Cook?” thread than what I have been posting.

    I used to watch Nick Stellino’s show, Cucina Amore, on PBS. Then, suddenly, he was gone, and a not very charismatic host narrated dishes by the “chefs” of Cucina Amore. I googled him, and he is still cooking and has a PBS show. I must not be in an area where it is shown.

    BAAKERAUNT:
    Good morning. I have seen his show every now & then on Saturday’s on COX CABLE CH #10 here in Las Vegas. (PBS)

    If I see it again I will send you the time he is on. Or if you can wire your server like DIRECT TV Corp. perhaps they will provide you
    with this info.

    Have a nice day my friend.

    ~CASS.

    #27009
    dachshundlady
    Participant

    My moms vinaigrette is my fave. Nothing fancy of course, she used the proportions on the Good Seasons shaker cruet(vinegar, water, oil). Then she added garlic salt and oregano. On the salad itself she always sprinkled celery salt, which is a most underrated ingredient. It’s also great in macaroni and potato salads.
    Cheers, MaryAnn aka dachshundlady

    #27010
    Mike Nolan
    Keymaster

    Celery salt is a standard component of a Chicago-style hot dog, along with a poppy seed bun and that day-glo green relish that you really can’t find outside of Chicago. Peppers are optional.

    #27016
    dachshundlady
    Participant

    Mike, is the celery salt inside the hotdog or sprinkled on top?

    #27027
    Mike Nolan
    Keymaster

    Sprinkled on top. Chicagoans disagree as to whether you want the bright yellow mustard or a stone-ground mustard. (Some hot dog places offer both.)

    Personally, I prefer grilled onions over raw unions, but they’re a bit of work to make so I seldom have them at home.

    Ketchup is on the menu as a test, if you order your Chicago hot dog with ketchup they know you’re not REALLY from Chicago!

    Ideally you would use Vienna all-beef hot dogs, but any all-beef hot dog will generally suffice.

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