Vinagrettes – Traditional and not-so-traditional

The textbook definition of a vinagrette is a suspension of an oil and vinegar, an acid, possibly with other seasonings in it. Sometimes, depending on what you add, it becomes an emulsion rather than a suspension. (A suspension usually separates, requiring it to be stirred or shaken again, an emulsion doesn’t, because there’s an emulsifier present, which holds the oil and vinegar in suspension.)

I got to thinking about the chicken breasts marinated in Marsala and mustard I made last week and came to the conclusion that the combination of wine (an acid) and mustard (oil-based) is essentially a vinagrette.

The proportions are different, though. The traditional proportions in a salad dressing vinagrette is 3 parts olive oil to one part vinegar.

For my chicken breasts I used about a half cup of wine and around a tablespoon of mustard, so it was probably about 8 parts acid to one part oil. I put the chicken in a bag, added the wine, squeezed in some mustard, and shook it all up. 8 hours or so marinating, followed by about 45 minutes on the grill.

So, what are your favorite types of vinagrette?

Spread the word
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •   
  •  
  •  
  •  
Date
Categories
Tags
Permalink
Status

Published:June 13, 2016

Cooking

Bookmark the permalink

Trackbacks are closed, but you can post a comment


Spread the word
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •   
  •  
  •  
  •  
Spread the word
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •   
  •  
  •  
  •  
Viewing 3 posts - 1 through 3 (of 3 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #1473
    Mike Nolan
    Keymaster

    The textbook definition of a vinagrette is a suspension of an oil and an acid, generally a vinegar, possibly with other seasonings in it. Sometimes, depending on what you add, it becomes an emulsion r
    [See the full post at: Vinagrettes – Traditional and not-so-traditional]

    Spread the word
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •   
    •  
    •  
    •  
    #1960
    BakerAunt
    Participant

    I do not get to do many vinaigrettes, as my husband does not do well with acidic foods. When I saw this topic, I remembered a recipe for Pasta con il Pollo e il Rosmarino–Pasta with Rosemary Chicken that appears in Nick Stellino’s Glorious Italian Cooking: Romantic Meals, Menus and Music from Cucina Amore (Putnam, 1999), pp. 78-79. I made it for him once, but he said it did not go well with his digestion. Sigh.

    In this recipe, boneless chicken breasts are marinated overnight in the refrigerator in 4 Tbs. olive oil, 3 Tbs. balsamic vinegar, 1/2 tsp salt, and 2 Tbs. chopped rosemary. The next day, the chicken is roasted, then cut into pieces and served with pasta in a light cream sauce. It is delicious, and I miss being able to do this kind of cooking. It would be a more interesting post in the “What Did You Cook?” thread than what I have been posting.

    I used to watch Nick Stellino’s show, Cucina Amore, on PBS. Then, suddenly, he was gone, and a not very charismatic host narrated dishes by the “chefs” of Cucina Amore. I googled him, and he is still cooking and has a PBS show. I must not be in an area where it is shown.

    • This reply was modified 4 years ago by BakerAunt.
    • This reply was modified 4 years ago by BakerAunt.
    #2230
    KIDPIZZA
    Participant

    I do not get to do many vinaigrettes, as my husband does not do well with acidic foods. When I saw this topic, I remembered a recipe for Pasta con il Pollo e il Rosmarino–Pasta with Rosemary Chicken that appears in Nick Stellino’s Glorious Italian Cooking: Romantic Meals, Menus and Music from Cucina Amore (Putnam, 1999), pp. 78-79. I made it for him once, but he said it did not go well with his digestion. Sigh.

    In this recipe, boneless chicken breasts are marinated overnight in the refrigerator in 4 Tbs. olive oil, 3 Tbs. balsamic vinegar, 1/2 tsp salt, and 2 Tbs. chopped rosemary. The next day, the chicken is roasted, then cut into pieces and served with pasta in a light cream sauce. It is delicious, and I miss being able to do this kind of cooking. It would be a more interesting post in the “What Did You Cook?” thread than what I have been posting.

    I used to watch Nick Stellino’s show, Cucina Amore, on PBS. Then, suddenly, he was gone, and a not very charismatic host narrated dishes by the “chefs” of Cucina Amore. I googled him, and he is still cooking and has a PBS show. I must not be in an area where it is shown.

    BAAKERAUNT:
    Good morning. I have seen his show every now & then on Saturday’s on COX CABLE CH #10 here in Las Vegas. (PBS)

    If I see it again I will send you the time he is on. Or if you can wire your server like DIRECT TV Corp. perhaps they will provide you
    with this info.

    Have a nice day my friend.

    ~CASS.

Viewing 3 posts - 1 through 3 (of 3 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
Spread the word
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •   
  •  
  •  
  •  
Spread the word
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •   
  •  
  •  
  •