What are you Baking the Week of June 19, 2022?

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  • #34384
    Mike Nolan
    Keymaster

    I need to make hamburger buns this week, but I have enough for supper tonight.

    I'm still planning to make the kouign amann (Breton butter cake) today.

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    #34388
    Mike Nolan
    Keymaster

    Here's what the kouign amman looked like when it came out of the oven:

    koughin-amman

    Here's what a slice of it looks like:

    Slice

    We think it's better with a little cinnamon and/or chocolate.

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    #34393
    BakerAunt
    Participant

    Most desserts are better with a little cinnamon and/or chocolate! 🙂

    I made Cornmeal-Pumpernickel Waffles for a special Father's Day breakfast this morning.

    #34395
    Joan Simpson
    Participant

    Mike you can see all the layers good.

    #34396
    Mike Nolan
    Keymaster

    This is more of a 'family' dessert than something I'd make for dinner with guests, I may try it again adding a little cinnamon to the butter block. The instructions have you take the butter block out of the fridge about 15 minutes before you start the lamination process, I think I'd cut that to 10 minutes in summertime, it was getting pretty soft as I made the folds. By the time you get it in the cake pan, its too late for refrigerating it to have much value.

    The instructions say not to worry if it looks like a mess going into the oven, it will come out great. It looked pretty good going in, though it was a bit messy getting it onto the parchment.

    IMG_0253

    We ate about half of it today, I'll be interested to see how it is tomorrow.

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    #34404
    Joan Simpson
    Participant

    Mike it looks good,I've never had it.

    #34405
    Mike Nolan
    Keymaster

    I thought it was going to be similar to the stuff I make with left over scraps of laminated dough, and it has some similarities, but also some differences.

    #34414
    BakerAunt
    Participant

    I baked blueberry cobbler, using frozen berries from the freezer, today, using my adaptation of a King Arthur cookbook recipe. Soon, it will be time to pick more blueberries.

    #34417
    BakerAunt
    Participant

    Although the house was still warm from yesterday's high 90s temperatures, on Wednesday morning, I baked a new recipe, "Strawberry Oatmeal Breakfast Muffins," from a healthy cooking and baking site by Marisa Moore, RND. I used white whole wheat flour in place of the optional half whole wheat, since whole what can overwhelm oatmeal flavor. I added a tablespoon of milk powder to increase the calcium. My neutral oil was canola. I reduced the salt by half to 1/4 tsp, and the brown sugar from 1/2 to 1/3 cup (my usual sugar amount for muffins). I also cut the vanilla by half to 1/2 tsp. to conserve it. I baked them as six large muffins, since I would eat two small ones (fewer muffin tin wells to grease). These are delicious and a good use for fresh strawberries from the local farmers' market. I will freeze three of the muffins for quick breakfasts.

    Here's the recipe link:

    Strawberry Oatmeal Breakfast Muffins

    #34433
    navlys
    Participant

    Thanks. They look like something I would like.

    #34437
    Mike Nolan
    Keymaster

    I made a batch of 14 burger buns, Moomie's recipe with a little whole meal flour added to give some color and texture. I brushed the top with a little honey water and sprinkled sesame seeds on.

    This will give me plenty of buns for the next several weeks, as most of them will go in the freezer.

    #34442
    BakerAunt
    Participant

    I used my adaptation of the Apricot-Oatmeal Bars recipe posted at Nebraska Kitchen to bake Seedless Blackberry Jam Oatmeal Bars on Saturday. I used white whole wheat flour, cut the salt in half, and slightly reduced the brown sugar to a half cup. Instead of cranberry juice in the crust, I used the juice I saved from the jarred Morello cherries that I used for last week's cherry pie. The jam is from a batch I made in summer of 2020.

    #34444
    aaronatthedoublef
    Participant

    We were in Iceland last week for a long anticipated family vacation. We'd been planning this since 2018 and were going to go in Dec. of 2019. We decided to wait until Summer of 2020 when it would be warmer and have longer days.

    It was wonderful and only a little warmer - it hit a high of 50 a couple of days. But there was no snow and almost no night.

    I'm attaching a couple of photos of a Lava Bread "baking" session. We didn't bake it or even mix the ingredients. They seal up the mix in a pot and bury it in a geothermal hotspot for 24 hours then take it out, cool it in the glacial runoff lake nearby, and unseal it. We watched as one loaf was uncovered and opened and as another was buried.

    The leavener is baking powder so it is more Rye quick bread. But it also has TWO CUPS of SUGAR. So we decided it is more cake than bread. It is springy and light and, as you might guess, very sweet. It was good with butter or smoked trout from the lake.

    The yeasted breads are noticeably salty. It's as if the Icelanders took all the salt the Tuscans and Umbrians don't use and put it in their bread.

    Icelandic-Rye-Bread

    Icelandic-Rye-Recipe

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    #34448
    aaronatthedoublef
    Participant

    Mike - Your kouign amann looks great. I've always been terrified of laminated yeast doughs.

    I was told by a Frenchman some years back it was to use up leftover croissant dough. Don't know if it's true but even if that's where it came from kouign amann has morphed into its own thing. How many dishes started out as poor food and ways to stretch or not waste things only to now become high end dishes.

    #34449
    BakerAunt
    Participant

    Aaron: Thanks for posting about Icelandic bread--and including pictures! I remember reading about this bread, possibly in one of Beatrice Ojakangas's Scandinavian bread books.

    I have a baking book by a Swedish chef which has LOTS of salt, so maybe it is a Scandinavian bread habit.

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