Pumpkins and Squash

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  • #36663
    BakerAunt
    Participant

    I love the farmers' market in the autumn when the pumpkins and squash arrive. I am stocking up on butternut squash and some spaghetti squash, and I am stocking up on pumpkins.

    I like peanut pumpkins and have bought another large one this year. I have six pie pumpkins and may buy two more. I was unable to buy a Fairy Tale pumpkin this year, which was one that we liked so much last year. The grower is thinking of starting them earlier next year, as they take longer to ripen. The ones they had out were still green, and they need to be the tan color for eating.

    He did direct me to a Long Island Cheese pumpkin, so I bought a large one of those to try. From what I read, it is native to New England area and is the pumpkin most used there. It should work for pies, soups, breads, etc. I'll post about it when I try it.

    Last week, I bought a Turban squash variety. I've never cooked one of these. The vendor said that a chef from a resort near here came to their place, and the turban squash were the ones he wanted. She said that she has used it as a side dish, baked, then cut into cubes. I looked online, and most people prepare it by cutting off the "cap" then halving it and the bottom, scooping out the seeds and strings, then roasting it. However, I found a YouTube video from Bethan's Kitchen and Garden, where she put the entire squash in a round pan with some water and roasted at 180C for an hour. She then showed how it cut nicely. However, she did not say how that affects the seeds and stringy mass, which I would have to be separated out after the squash roasted. I would think that would be harder to do.

    Has anyone here ever roasted a Turban squash??

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    #36667
    Mike Nolan
    Keymaster

    The biggest challenge might be getting the seeds and strings out without removing a lot of the edible parts of the squash, especially when it's all hot.

    #36669
    BakerAunt
    Participant

    That's what I thought as well, Mike. I plan to roast it the other way, even if it is hard to cut the cap off.

    #36670
    Mike Nolan
    Keymaster

    I don't eat a lot of squash (spaghetti squash is one of the few I'll eat), I may not have been aware that a turban squash was even edible, I'm pretty sure my wife has never made one for herself. Having to cut the cap off seems like a waste, especially when they sell them by the pound.

    #36674
    BakerAunt
    Participant

    Mike--as I understand it, the cap gets roasted as well. It just is done earlier and taken out of the oven earlier.

    #36864
    BakerAunt
    Participant

    I roasted the turban squash yesterday, and I was underwhelmed. On the positive side, the flesh holds its shape, so if you want squash cubes, you can get them. On the negative side, there is a large interior cavity with lots and lots of seeds. The bumpy bottom did not have much by way of flesh, and so was a waste.

    It is possible that my squash was a bit past its prime, as I did not find it any harder to cut than any other squashes. I use a serrated knife, made particularly for pumpkins and squash, made by Kuhn Rikon, which I picked up on year at T. J. Maxx.

    After I cut off the skin from the roasted squash pieces (roasted at 400F for 50 minutes, skin side down), I returned them to a 375F oven for 15 minutes, while the rest of dinner cooked, then put them in a bowl and tossed them with maple syrup, since it needed some sweetness.

    I will not be roasting another turban squash. It is not worth the effort it requires. I will stick to butternut, Honey Nut, spaghetti squash, and the flavorful varieties of pumpkins, with an occasional acorn squash.

    #36876
    navlys
    Participant

    Ba, don't forget to include delicata squash. The skin is even edible and the flesh is sweet and creamy!

    #36879
    BakerAunt
    Participant

    I'll add delicata to my list, Navlys! Thanks!

    #36882
    chocomouse
    Participant

    I grew delicata squash for the first time this year, and I've never tasted it. It is curing now, but about ready to eat. I'm not so excited about eating the skin! Just doesn't seem right, after 70+ years of not eating squash skins!! We'll see.

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